Archive for category News

Take a walk on the B-side: Increase in vinyl sales not surprising to Scratch n’ Spin owner

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS PHOTOS, AN INFOGRAPHIC AND OUTSIDE LINKS. TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE MATERIALS, VISIT THE CAROLINA  REPORTER & NEWS.

Customers can bring in their new or used vinyls, CDs, movies and other items to sell or trade in. Rare finds like old Beatles and Jimi Hendrix records can be found at Scratch N’ Spin as well as newer albums by Taylor Swift and Drake.

By Caroline Davenport
CAROLINA REPORTER & NEWS

Vinyl albums are expected to become a billion-dollar industry by the end of 2017.

It could seem counter-intuitive that a decades-old way of listening to music is making a resurgence in our digital, hyper-portable music era driven by the newest singles.

But vinyl never really went away, according to Eric Woodard, owner of Scratch n’ Spin record store in West Columbia. He said while mainstream retailers like Walmart, Sears and Target stopped carrying vinyl, it was still being produced in smaller quantities. Smaller mom-and-pop shops like his kept the format alive, and for some bands, producing vinyl has always been a staple.

     Woodard believes the increase in record sales ultimately comes down to value. When people spend money on music, they want something they can enjoy for years.  A vinyl album with its intricate artwork fits that bill.

“I think it’s inherently a part of the human experience. You want to have that shelf with your collection on it, and you want to be able to have a party or have friends over and show off your collection of books or have friends flip through your album collection,” he said.

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Traveling postcards workshop creates healing, recovery through art

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS PHOTOS, AN INFOGRAPHIC AND OUTSIDE LINKS. TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE MATERIALS, VISIT THE CAROLINA  REPORTER & NEWS.

By Debbie Clark
CAROLINA NEWS AND REPORTER

Caroline Lovell started the Traveling Postcards workshops in 2009

On a recent weekday, Caroline Lovell transformed a second floor room in USC’s new Center for Health and Well-Being into a place where healing and art come together.

As participants trickled in one by one and filled every seat, Lovell opened her Traveling Postcards workshop with an introduction exercise and gentle words.

Lovell, founder and executive director of the Women’s Wisdom Initiative, began Traveling Postcards in 2009 as a way to use the healing arts to address trauma caused by sexual and domestic violence and other types of oppression. Workshop participants decorate postcards to be hand-delivered to survivors around the world.

“We give you the opportunity to settle into that space and into your heart to have a communication with a survivor that is genuine,” she said.

So far, more than 4,000 postcards have traveled all over the world, from Costa Rica to Afghanistan. The organization works with worldwide aid agencies as well as military and domestic violence shelters on college campuses. Lovell said the stop at USC is the last in a month-long college tour that started in Boston a month ago.

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Bucking millennial trend, USC sweethearts ready to say “I do”

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS PHOTOS, AN INFOGRAPHIC AND OUTSIDE LINKS. TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE MATERIALS, VISIT THE CAROLINA  REPORTER & NEWS.

By Janelle Buniel
CAROLINA REPORTER & NEWS

University of South Carolina graduate students Elizabeth Rogers and Nick Doyle have been dating for six years, and people are already asking, “Why don’t you just get married?”

For many of their generation, it’s not that simple.

Recent polls have suggested that fewer members of the millennial generation – those born after 1980 who came of age at the turn of the new century – are getting married compared to Generation X, the generation that precedes them. A Gallup poll showed that 59 percent of millennials are single and have never married, as opposed to 16 percent of Generation X.

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The play’s the thing: Three SC theaters connect communities to stage with contemporary, creative works

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS PHOTOS, AN INFOGRAPHIC AND OUTSIDE LINKS TO THE THEATERS’ SITES. TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE MATERIALS, VISIT THE CAROLINA  REPORTER & NEWS.

By Debbie Clark
CAROLINA REPORTER AND NEWS

When Jim and Kay Thigpen founded Columbia’s Trustus Theatre 33 years ago, they had the radical notion that the city was hungry for contemporary theater. They were right.

Now, Trustus and other playhouses across the state provide settings where theatergoers can settle in to be challenged, informed and sometimes shocked, into thinking of critical issues of the day.

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Scout’s honor: This Scoutmaster says admission of girls will strengthen youth organization and families

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS PACKAGE CONTAINS PHOTOS, AN INFOGRAPHIC AND OUTSIDE LINKS TO SCOUTING SITES. TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE MATERIALS, VISIT THE CAROLINA  REPORTER & NEWS.

 

By Caroline Davenport
CAROLINA REPORTER & NEWS

The public’s response to the Boy Scouts of America’s decision to accept girls into its iconic Scout and Cub programs was swift and fierce, and the debate is expected to continue.

Opponents put forth a simple argument: the Boy Scouts program is for boys, and the Girl Scouts program is for girls. But the scouting organization as a whole is much broader, and not exclusive to boys only, officials said.

“The Boy Scouts of America has a larger umbrella than just ‘the Boy Scouts’,” said Columbia resident Chris Jordan, who has served in many positions within Boy Scouts of America, including Scoutmaster for 14 years. He is also the father of two Eagle Scouts. He says the only groups within the organization that aren’t already co-ed are The Boy Scouts and The Cub Scouts.

Families will be allowed to enroll both boys and girls into Cub Scouts in the 2018 program year.  In a statement Oct. 11, the non-profit organization said existing packs may choose to establish a new girl pack, establish a pack that consists of girl dens and boy dens or remain an all-boy pack.  Cub Scout dens will be single-gender — all boys or all girls.

Other Scouting groups like Explorers and Venturing have been open to boys and girls since 1971. Both the Sea and STEM Scouting programs are also co-ed.

“The shift and change taken by BSA is one that brings the whole organization together utilizing the same joining criteria for all branches of the tree,” Jordan said. Read the rest of this entry »

Total Eclipse, Easley

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Total Eclipse, Easley

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Total Eclipse, Easley

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Total Eclipse, Easley

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Total Eclipse, Easley

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Photo by Kasie Strickland | The Sentinel-Progress

Total Eclipse, Columbia

Onlookers watch the eclipse during totality, the only time it can be viewed without special glasses. Onlookers are participants of the NSTAR physics conference at University of South Carolina in Columbia. Physicists came from all over the world to share information and view the eclipse on campus. Photo by Denise McGill

Onlookers watch the eclipse during totality, the only time it can be viewed without special glasses. Onlookers are participants of the NSTAR physics conference at University of South Carolina in Columbia. Physicists came from all over the world to share information and view the eclipse on campus. Photo by Denise McGill

Total Eclipse, Columbia

View of total solar eclipse in Columbia, S.C., on August 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandria Cone and Denise McGill

View of total solar eclipse in Columbia, S.C., on August 21, 2017. Photo by Alexandria Cone and Denise McGill

Total Eclipse, Columbia

Early view of partial eclipse Columbia, S.C., on August 21, 2017. Image taken through a long lens with a solar fllter. Photo by Alexandria Cone and Denise McGill

Early view of partial eclipse Columbia, S.C., on August 21, 2017. Image taken through a long lens with a solar filter. Photo by Alexandria Cone and Denise McGill.

Total Eclipse, Columbia

USC student volunteer Leticia Pena shows onlookers how to view the eclipse through a Sun Spotter device. It was one of many stations set up throughout Columbia, S.C., for viewing the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017 Photo by Denise McGill

USC student volunteer Leticia Pena shows onlookers how to view the eclipse through a Sun Spotter device. It was one of many stations set up throughout Columbia, S.C., for viewing the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017. Photo by Denise McGill

You could be paying twice for V.C. Summer

Robert Meyerowitz for TheNerve.org

August 18, 2007

In the wake of Santee Cooper and SCE&G abandoning construction of two nuclear reactors at the V.C. Summer site in Jenkinsville, there’s been a lot of media discussion about who’s to blame and who will pay.

The fear for many is that the electricity customers of the two providers will keep paying now for a project that may never be completed. And there’s a building sentiment that state government is to blame, at least for having failed to exercise adequate oversight of the partners’ activities, since Santee Cooper is owned by the state and SCE&G is regulated by it.

Less noticed has been the situation of what appears to be SCE&G’s biggest customer and ratepayer: the state of South Carolina.

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Senator Greg Hembree, R-Horry, talks about the efforts of a Senate Education subcommittee

Senator Greg Hembree, R-Horry, talks about the efforts of a Senate Education subcommittee, which is examining out-of-state tuition abatements at S.C. public colleges. View the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWY0LEjqfMQ

Where was the utilities committee?

By Hannah Hill for TheNerve.com

August 11, 2017

Earlier this week the House speaker and the Senate president pro tem each created special legislative committees in response to the abandonment of the V.C. Summer nuclear project.

Speaker Jay Lucas said in his press release that “The only responsible path forward is to comprehensively study the issue,” and that “Every possible option must be considered and remains on the table.” He particularly encouraged the committee to review the Base Load Review Act and examine the state Public Service Commission’s authority.

Leatherman’s letter announcing his committee used similar language, adding that the Senate committee has the authority to review “all aspects of this project and the chain of decisions made by the management of SCE&G and Santee Cooper as well as the governmental actions of the Public Service Commission and the Office of Regulatory Staff.”

That sounds well and good, doesn’t it? After all, lawmakers created the system and passed the Base Load Review Act, so they should take responsibility for fixing it, right?

Except… there’s a problem. One government board is missing from Leatherman’s list of things to look into – and it may bear the greatest culpability of all: the Public Utilities Review Committee (PURC).

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Senator Paul Campbell, R-Berkeley, talks about his appointment to the V.C. Summer Nuclear Project Review Committee

Senator Paul Campbell, R-Berkeley, talks about his appointment to the V.C. Summer Nuclear Project Review Committee, particularly what the group will review and what are the policy decisions that will be discussed.  View the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R8F1KQG12c

Alarms on nukes fiasco sounded years ago

By Robert Meyerowitz for TheNerve.org

August 9, 2017

When Santee Cooper and SCE&G pulled the plug on their shared project to build two nuclear reactors in Jenkinsville at the beginning of last week, it was a “wow” moment and rightly so. For one thing, several thousand employees were thrown out of work with no warning.

Yet with the benefit of hindsight, this fiasco was like a freight train that had been steadily approaching for years, a speck in the distance, a slightly bigger speck in the distance, slightly bigger… “is that a train?” — and then, one day it arrived all hiss and clang, right on time.

“No one anticipated what kind of a catastrophe this would turn into,” Senate Minority Leader Nikki Setzler told the Associated Press late last week.

Keep in mind that Setzler said this despite his having co-sponsored the 2007 Base Load Review Act, the law that positioned SCE&G parent company SCANA to risk so much on the project, where it was the majority partner, while insulating itself from loss and enriching its shareholders.

That’s what economists call a moral hazard. And it shouldn’t have been hard to see before last week that it posed at least a potential problem.

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South Carolinians fall short on education, finance, wealth

Robert Meyerowitz for TheNerve.org

August 7, 2017

South Carolina businesses are much more likely to be white-owned than businesses on average in the U.S., and less likely to be owned by women. Does that affect its prosperity?

At the same time, businesses owned by men and by whites are more valuable than minority and female-owned businesses, and the difference in value in South Carolina is even greater than the average national difference.

A greater percentage of the South Carolina workforce toils in low-wage jobs, 30.4 percent, than the national average of 24.2 percent, ranking South Carolina 42nd from the best among all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Adding insult to injury, the average annual pay for a South Carolina worker is $46,411, well below the national average of $52,942 — and those figures are adjusted for cost of living.

These data are some of the findings which led the non-partisan group Prosperity Now, a D.C.-based nonpartisan nonprofit that promotes “household financial health,”to give the state an “F’ on its recent annual report card, in its category for Business & Jobs. For South Carolina, it argues, this all means prosperity later if ever.

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