SCNewsExchange.com is a cooperative sharing site exclusively for use by members and associate members of the S.C. Press Association. Stories, editorials and photos are for use only in member publications and on their websites. This sharing site only works if you participate. If you have something you would like to share, please do so. Please use appropriate bylines and credit lines to recognize where material came from.

Do we need more learning on the Constitution? Maybe

Editor’s note: Contact info for this story is Deborah Swearingen, 803-221-7958, swearind@email.sc.edu.

Stories, photos and videos provided by University of South Carolina journalism students are available to the state’s news publications and websites. We ask that bylines be retained and, when possible, clips be provided for student portfolios. The mailing address is Dr. Deborah Gump, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208.

The direct link for the video: https://youtu.be/CUMJtVDT4p0

The embed code: <iframe width=”560″ height=”315″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/CUMJtVDT4p0″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

***

By Deborah Swearingen
USC School of Journalism

How much do South Carolinian students know about the U.S. Constitution?

Not enough, according to a House bill discussed in committee on Wednesday (March 25). If passed, high school and college students would be required to take classes on the U.S. Constitution, Declaration of Independence and Federalist Papers.

The 2011 South Carolina high school social studies standards require teachers to cover all of the founding documents, so we were curious about the necessity of extra coursework.

Would specialized courses be productive?

We hit the streets to find out just how much some students on the University of South Carolina Columbia campus really know.

What we found in our quick sampling was a mixed bag. But ask yourself: How would you do on our quiz?

Find out here.

A constitutional pop quiz.jpg

Fifth-graders bring questions – and answers – to the State House

Editor’s note: Contact info for this story is Rebecca Johnson, 803-320-0284, john2658@email.sc.edu.

Stories, photos and videos provided by University of South Carolina journalism students are available to the state’s news publications and websites. We ask that bylines be retained and, when possible, clips or PDFs be provided for student portfolios. The mailing address is Dr. Deborah Gump, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208.

***

By Rebecca Johnson
USC School of Journalism

Are you smarter than a fifth grader?

If you don’t know the ins and outs of national and state government, there are a few 10-year-olds from Calhoun County who could give you a run for your money.

Six students visited the State House Thursday, impressing representatives with their knowledge of the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Independence and the organization of South Carolina government.

The kids toured the capitol to learn more about the foundations of state government. Afterward, they were recognized in both the House and Senate, which was the best part for most of them, their mouths open in awe at the chamber ceilings.

“It makes me feel good about myself. I feel smart,” said one child from Foundation Christian School.

“It’s really amazing how they’ve become experts on our Constitution,” Rep. Russell Ott, a Calhoun Democrat, told the House of Representatives. “I was really blown away by their inquisitive questions.”

Ott warned anyone who dared to test them on their knowledge: “Prepare to be humbled.”

And the questions came throughout the day, from legislators, their teachers, the tour guide – even the gift shop attendant.

How many seats there are in the General Assembly? 170.

What’s the stone that made the columns in the State House? Blue granite.

What’s the pattern on the State House carpet? Palmetto fronds.

The kids had their own questions, such as why the speaker of the House wears black and the lieutenant governor wears purple. And the dome – so many questions about the dome.

The field trip was sponsored by the Sandy Run Ruritan Club and supported by the Liberty Day Institute, which supplied T-shirts and information materials. The nonprofit, nonpartisan organization works to educate Americans, especially younger ones, on the fundamentals of the U.S. Constitution.

But the six students from Calhoun County were the only ones there for Liberty Day.

John Nelson, Sandy Run Ruritan member and Calhoun County councilman, wished more students from other schools had participated.

“There’s probably a void out there for many of them as to what our government does, what it’s all about and how we make laws, and who makes the laws,” Nelson said. Children need to know how government operates because “what these people do in this building are going to affect their lives.”

Ott would agree. “It’s an additional lesson in civics for our kids, and the bottom line is I don’t think we focus enough on it,” he said. He hoped that coming to the State House would stay with the children and, hopefully, keep them interested.

None of the students was sure about a career in government. Two want to be teachers, another a dancer and another a pizza chef.

But there’s still time for them to change their minds.

Teacher Brian Day, Sandy Run Ruritan Club Member John Nelson, Principal Brenda Goodwin, Rep. Russell Ott and Ruritan Member Howard Pees , with the Liberty Day participants.

From left, teacher Brian Day, Sandy Run Ruritan member John Nelson, Principal Brenda Goodwin, Rep. Russell Ott and Ruritan member Howard Pees with the Liberty Day participants. Photo by Rebecca Johnson.

Liberty Day students talk with Rep. Russell Ott, D-Calhoun, about the Bill of Rights and the South Carolina government.

Liberty Day students talk with Rep. Russell Ott, D-Calhoun, about the Bill of Rights and South Carolina government. Photo by Rebecca Johnson.

A Liberty Day participant toys with a spyglass in the State House gift shop.

A Liberty Day participant toys with a spyglass in the State House gift shop. Photo by Rebecca Johnson.

The Liberty Day participants stand to be recognized by Rep. Russell Ott in the House chambers.

The Liberty Day participants stand to be recognized by Rep. Russell Ott in the House chamber. Photo by Rebecca Johnson.

Liberty Day began with a tour of the State House.

Liberty Day began with a tour of the State House for Calhoun County students. Photo by Rebecca Johnson.

Roasted: Why we like watching others (think Justin Bieber) cringe

Editor’s note: Contact info for this story is Deborah Swearingen, 803-221-7958, swearind@email.sc.edu.

Stories, photos and videos provided by University of South Carolina journalism students are available to the state’s news publications and websites. We ask that bylines be retained and, when possible, clips be provided for student portfolios. The mailing address is Dr. Deborah Gump, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208.

***

By Deborah Swearingen
USC School of Journalism

Host a roast, and America will watch.

Roasts, like the one that polarizing pop star Justin Bieber will be subjected to on Monday, are the pinnacle of schadenfreude. Well-known comedians, actors and other stars take turns making fun of a chosen celebrity, who must sit back and take the heat, millions watching their embarrassment on TV, until the end – when they are given time to fire back.

Televised roasts have been a hit since their inception. Nearly 3.2 million viewers tuned in to Comedy Central in 2013 to watch the Roast of James Franco, a celebrity far less controversial than Bieber.

But, as a society, why are we so infatuated with seeing real-life people taken down a notch on TV?

“We often find it entertaining to find others making a fool of themselves,” said Randy Covington, a media ethics professor at the University of South Carolina. Covington also involves the idea of humiliation in media in his ethics classes, referencing a 2002 New York Times article on reality TV.

“More than sex, more than violence, humiliation is the unifying principle behind a successful reality show,” the article reads.

Viewers can also bond over the embarrassment of others, particularly when they are celebrities, said Mathieu Deflem, a pop culture enthusiast and USC sociology professor.

“We get a certain pleasure, if you will, in trying to remove people from that pedestal,” he said.

Roasts predate reality TV, Covington said, adding that they are typically a more gentle form of fun.

Deflem said that roasts can be productive, referencing an anthropological concept called mocking relationships, which shows that under certain circumstances, a person is mocked to resolve an existing tension.

“By mocking the other person, you actually show respect because you affirm that, well, there is that tension and that they have a certain authority,” Deflem said.

He added that a roast can actually be considered a form of praise. He said that although the jokes are a bit contrived, the celebrities always laugh along and make light of the situation.

Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun, is hoping that the roast on Monday night could be a step in the right direction for his client as well. In a video interview with Inc. magazine, he said that the roast came at just the right time, given Bieber’s recent troubles – the teenage pop star was arrested for drunken driving a year ago.

“Part of it was just Justin being able to take it on the chin, and show the world that, look, I screwed up. I know I did. Let’s all talk about it. Let’s all laugh, and let’s move on. Because I’m a young man, I’m growing up, and I’m sorry,” Braun said in the interview.

Hosted by comedian Kevin Hart, Bieber’s roast features other celebrities like comedians Hannibal Buress and Natasha Leggero, rapper Snoop Dogg and even former basketball player Shaquille O’Neal. Deflem said he found it striking that so many celebrities were participating.

“So they think it’s OK to be associated with him,” Deflem said, smiling.

It’s the young star’s first go-round in roasting, so beware Beliebers – it gets a bit harsh.

**

Ready to roast?
Want to catch the show? Here’s how.

Where? Comedy Central
When? Monday, March 30
What time? 10 p.m., EST
Who’s roastin’? Kevin Hart (host), Hannibal Buress, Chris D’Elia, Pete Davidson, Snoop Dogg, Natasha Leggero, Ludacris, Shaquille O’Neal, Jeffrey Ross, Martha Stewart

**

Mathieu Deflem, a sociology professor at the University of South Carolina, said comedy roasts can be a positive form of public humiliation. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Mathieu Deflem, a sociology professor at the University of South Carolina, said comedy roasts can be a positive form of public humiliation. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

My Brain on NASCAR: Welcome Back, Kurt Busch

Cathy Elliott

Cathy Elliott

By Cathy Elliott

March 24, 2015

If I had to list the drivers people have asked me about over the years, Kurt Busch wouldn’t be in the top 10.

But over the course of the past several weeks, he has been number one.

I’ve internally debated what my response should be. Do I defend NASCAR’s decision to suspend Busch from racing for a couple of weeks while waiting for a court’s decision on whether or not to bring criminal charges against him? (He was reinstated in time for the March 22 race at Auto Club Speedway, where he started on the pole.)

Do I loudly decry violence against women – or against anyone, for that matter – for the whole wide world to hear? Do I decline to say anything at all? Most importantly, does it even matter what I think?

Call it self-congratulatory, but I haven’t heard many women sticking up for Kurt, so I kind of think it might.

I have only one had one meaningful encounter with Kurt Busch. Here’s what happened.

I was the director of public relations at Darlington Raceway on March 18, 2003 – that was back in the glory days when Darlington had two annual Sprint Cup Series weekend; just thought I’d throw that one out there, NASCAR – when fans who came for a race left as witnesses to history.

It was the day Ricky Craven beat Kurt Busch (who was battling the car as well as the track since his power steering had gone out several laps earlier), to the checkered flag by .002 seconds. It was the closest finish in NASCAR history, and one heck of a show.

We brought Kurt and Ricky back to the track for a media event, and as part of the old-school promotional silliness that Darlington was famous for back in the day, asked them to put on boxing gloves and pose for a photo op on the start/finish line. They declined the invitation to wear the satin trunks, citing skin allergies or something like that. Go figure.

Think about it; it’s great to be part of the closest-ever finish if you end up in Victory Lane at the end of the day, but for the second-place guy, well … you kind of become the sport’s most famous loser. Yet Kurt Busch, without complaint, drove himself from the Charlotte area to Darlington, SC on a Tuesday morning and posed for a slightly embarrassing photo to promote a race at a track where he had never scored a win.

In all my years at Darlington, I can honestly say I never worked with anyone more gracious and accommodating.

In a court of law, one person can hang a jury. In the court of public opinion, this may be more akin to a lone voice crying in the wilderness, saying something that few agree with.

We have seen Kurt Busch lose his temper and let his mouth get the better of him. That’s happened to me; it’s probably happened to you, too. We have seen him blame his co-workers, AKA his team members, for a poor job performance. I’ve done that; you probably have, too. We have seen him lose jobs as a result of his questionable behavior; that’s probably happened to some of us, too.

And we have definitely experienced the thrill of seeing him race. Week after week, he reminds us that as far as pure driving ability goes, he is as good as anyone in NASCAR, and better than most. Like him or not, you can’t deny his talent. I love to watch Kurt Busch drive that stock car, and hope I’ll be able to continue doing that for a very long time.

The details of Busch’s domestic problems have been prominently featured by most national news outlets for a number of weeks now – where is all this coverage when the really positive stuff happens in NASCAR, by the way? – so I don’t feel the need to reiterate them here.

I do, however, feel the need to stick up for the guy. If we’re going to judge somebody and endanger the décor of our glass houses in the process, then whenever possible we should try to base our opinions on what we know of the person in question through our own experience.

For me, it’s time to put these recent events in the rearview, stop talking about it already, and get on with the so-far exciting 2015 racing season. The court system couldn’t find a reason to charge Kurt Busch with anything; who are we to judge?

FONTANA, CA - MARCH 21:  Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, climbs into his car prior to practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Auto Club 400 at Auto Club Speedway on March 21, 2015 in Fontana, California.  (Photo by Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images) Photo credit: Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images

FONTANA, CA – MARCH 21: Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Chevrolet, climbs into his car prior to practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Auto Club 400 at Auto Club Speedway on March 21, 2015 in Fontana, California. (Photo by Matt Sullivan/NASCAR via Getty Images)

Cathy Elliott is the former director of public relations for Darlington Raceway and author of the books Chicken Soup for the Soul: NASCAR and Darlington Raceway: Too Tough To Tame. Contact her at cathyelliott@hotmail.com.

Senate gets first look at bill that would ease access to HPV vaccine

Editor’s note: Contact info for this story is Deborah Swearingen, 803-221-7958, swearind@email.sc.edu.

Stories, photos and videos provided by University of South Carolina journalism students are available to the state’s news publications and websites. We ask that bylines be retained and, when possible, clips be provided for student portfolios. The mailing address is Dr. Deborah Gump, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208.

***

By Deborah Swearingen
USC School of Journalism

In 2013, South Carolina was one of five states to see a significant increase in the number of adolescents receiving vaccines for HPV, or the human papillomavirus.

A bill moving through the State House aims to continue the state’s progress. If passed, it would allow the Department of Health and Environmental Control to recommend the Gardasil vaccine for children entering seventh grade and to give parents information on HPV and cervical cancer.

The Cervical Cancer Prevention Act, which passed the House March 19 by a vote of 83-27, would also help underinsured teenagers pay for the vaccination. The bill gets its first hearing in the Senate Medical Affairs Subcommittee Wednesday.

The state’s vaccination program does not cover the HPV vaccine for children who are underinsured. However, the vaccination is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the federal government pays for children qualifying for Medicaid to receive the vaccination.

Cervical cancer is one of the primary threats of HPV, but the virus can cause any anal, genital or oral cancer, said Heather Brandt, co-chair of Cervical Cancer-Free South Carolina and an associate professor at the University of South Carolina’s Arnold Palmer School of Public Health.

While the discussion about HPV has primarily centered on females, males can also get the virus and several of the cancers as well. They are also recommended for the vaccine.

The vaccination is safe and effective, said Dr. J. Routt Reigart, president of South Carolina’s chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics and former pediatrician at the Medical University of South Carolina.

“There’s no reason in the world that all adolescents shouldn’t get it,” Reigart said.

The CDC estimates that upwards of 3 million women have abnormal Pap test results each year, although only around 10,000 actually get cervical cancer.

“You can scoff at those numbers if you think they’re small,” Brandt said. “But let’s talk about the 2 million women that have abnormal Pap tests, have the anxiety of thinking they might have cervical cancer, have to spend the time, money and energy following up on those abnormal Paps to make sure that everything that is going to be OK.”

Brandt said that some people oppose the vaccination because they fear it will encourage more premarital sex. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the country, according to the CDC.

But Rep. Beth Bernstein, D-Richland, lead sponsor of the bill, said that the vaccine should be administered at age 11 or 12 – before many engage in sexual relations.

“This bill is really for people who don’t know about the virus, don’t know that there’s a vaccine that can prevent it, don’t know that once you have the virus, the vaccine isn’t going to help,” Bernstein said.

Bernstein said she and Rep. James Smith, D-Richland, went to Sen. Brad Hutto, D-Orangeburg, to get an identical Senate bill introduced.

Bernstein, who is optimistic that the Senate will approve the bill, said Gov. Nikki Haley promised to sign the bill if it passes the Senate.

A large poster sits outside of Heather Brandt's USC office, outlining the state's work with cervical cancer prevention. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

A large poster sits outside of Heather Brandt’s USC office, outlining the state’s work with cervical cancer prevention. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Heather Brandt, co-chair of Cervical Cancer-Free South Carolina, said the HPV vaccine is cancer prevention for the future. Headshot provided by Heather Brandt.

Heather Brandt, co-chair of Cervical Cancer-Free South Carolina, said the HPV vaccine is cancer prevention for the future. Photo provided by Heather Brandt.

C-Cancer

Rep. Beth Bernstein hopes that all of South Carolina’s children will soon have access to the HPV vaccine. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

 

CAMP KEMO programs boost spirits of sick S.C. children

Editor’s note: Contact info for this story is Deborah Swearingen, 803-221-7958, swearind@email.sc.edu.

Stories, photos and videos provided by University of South Carolina journalism students are available to the state’s news publications and websites. We ask that bylines be retained and, when possible, clips be provided for student portfolios. The mailing address is Dr. Deborah Gump, School of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. 29208.

***

By Deborah Swearingen
USC School of Journalism

Keldon Hemingway’s curly black hair bounced as he jumped from person to person in the crowded lobby, convincing pretty much anyone he approached to buy one – or several – of the flashing rings and necklaces that filled the bucket hanging from his hand.

“C’moooooon, you know you want one!” he pleaded, though not much of a plea was necessary when people saw his bubbly grin and black sports coat, made even classier by an orange bowtie.

By his side at EdVenture Children’s Museum in Columbia, site of the annual KEMOPALOOZA fundraiser for children with potentially fatal illnesses last Friday night, was Clay Dixon, his best friend.

Both were diagnosed with inoperable brain tumors at age 6.

Clay and Keldon’s colorful jewelry, to be used in a game later in the evening, was just one of the evening’s fundraisers. Others included a silent auction and palooza packs, where attendees could pay $25 for a random bottle of wine and gift card.

They weren’t showing it, but both boys have experienced more hardship in just 13 years than some do in a lifetime. But thanks to CAMP KEMO programs like CAMP KEMO itself, a weeklong summer camp for children with cancer and blood disorders, the two boys remained positive even through the chemotherapy and hospital stays.

Hemingway was admitted to the Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital, where he was diagnosed with an inoperable, benign brain tumor.

Sheila Hemingway, Keldon’s mother, said their story began as many do, with a simple problem on a normal day that quickly turned their lives upside down.

She said she had always heard of the Children’s Miracle Network but had no reason to apply it to her life.

“You just don’t realize that there are so many children who are sick,” she said. “You don’t realize this whole world exists.”

Hemingway met Dixon when they were diagnosed, and the two quickly bonded over their similar diagnoses and age. But that’s not all they have in common.

“We’re both small,” Hemingway said, grinning.

Both boys have become well-known examples of the CAMP KEMO programs in effect.

They are just two of the 80,000 children across the state who receive treatment at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital each year.

At the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, a specialized Palmetto Health entity on the Richland campus, more than 1,000 children are treated each year.

The eight CAMP KEMO programs are designed to help sick children and their families maintain a sense of fun and normalcy in their lives.

Originally, his mother had been reluctant to allow Keldon to attend the summer camp and leave for a week since he had not been out of her sight since he was diagnosed. But eventually she realized that the only time he felt completely normal was when he attended CAMP KEMO.

His brother, Kendale, who has been to every chemotherapy treatment with Keldon, was able to attend the summer camp as well. He said CAMP KEMO helped keep his little brother’s spirits up.

“When he first had chemo, and he was going through his hardest times, CAMP KEMO is what kept him going,” Kendale said.

All CAMP KEMO programs are paid for entirely by donations, and last year funding from KEMOPALOOZA alone allowed for 115 campers to go to camp for free, according to Priscilla Young, development director at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital. Last year, the event raised around $82,000, and she said they hoped to beat that total this year.

She also said it’s an honor to work for the children and families treated at the hospital.

“I feel grateful to love what I do and get to work for some of the most amazing miracles that you ever would meet,” Young said.

Even at a young age, both Keldon and Clay understand the concept of giving back, said Ashley Dusenbury, assistant vice president of public relations at the Palmetto Health Foundation.

Hemingway and Dixon each said that it means a lot to be able to help out at events like KEMOPALOOZA.

“If they had one of these every day, I would try my hardest to come out,” Dixon said.

Why? The answer is simple.

Now, he said, he’s able to help out children who need it more than he does.

 

Keldon Hemingway charms Kemopalooza attendees in his spiffy outfit. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Keldon Hemingway charms KEMOPALOOZA attendees in his spiffy outfit. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Two colorful CAMP KEMO cornhole boards were also up for sale at the auction last Friday evening. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Two colorful CAMP KEMO cornhole boards were up for auction last Friday’s KEMOPALOOZA. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

A pair of Marcus Lattimore's autographed cleats and gloves were auctioned off at the event. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Marcus Lattimore, whose gloves and cleats were up for auction Friday night, goofs around with Keldon Hemingway, left, and his brother, Kendale. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Clay Dixon enjoys the feeling he gets when he helps out children who are going through a hard time. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

Clay Dixon said he enjoys the feeling he gets when he helps out children who are going through a hard time. Photo by Deborah Swearingen, USC School of Journalism.

campkemographiccropped

“Vote for Loretta” by Stuart Neiman

“Bush and Walker” by Stuart Neiman

“Bush and Walker” by Stuart Neiman

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

Cartoon from The Times and Democrat

South Carolina Basketball

More pictures from the SC News Exchange here, just paste the link in your Browser and download full res pictures. These pictures with full captions and ID’s are all posted on the SC News Exchange. Thanks, Gwinn_ Any specific photo needs from the games, call (864) 915-0411 or email GwinnDavis@gmail.com

Here is the link to paste in Browser:

http://www.gwinndavisphotos.com/Other-47/South-Carolina-Beats-Syracuse/48171921_JsJxSS#!i=3947213176&k=RtNNNKm

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina head coach Dawn Staley celebrates with Tiffany Davis (15). South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

Syracuse forward Isabella Slim (10) defends against South Carolina guard Olivia Gaines (2). South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina guard Olivia Gaines (2) and Syracuse guard Danielle Minott (21) battle for the ball. South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina guard A’Ja Wilson (22) works against Syracuse guard Cornelia Fondren (11).
South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina guard A’Ja Wilson (22) scores over Syracuse forward Bria Day (55). South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina forward Aleighsa Welch (24) celebrates.
South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina guard A’Ja Wilson (22) pulls in a rebound in front of Syracuse guard Cornelia Fondren (11). South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

Syracuse Cheerleaders show their spirit. South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse

South Carolina Basketball

South Carolina center Alaina Coates (41) scores as Syracuse center Briana Day (50) defends. South Carolina hosts Syracuse during the 2nd round of the NCAA Tournament Sunday, March 22, 2015 at Carolina’s Colonial Life Arena.
GWINN DAVIS / SC PRESSSouth Carolina vs. Syracuse