SCNewsExchange.com is a cooperative sharing site exclusively for use by members and associate members of the S.C. Press Association. Stories, editorials and photos are for use only in member publications and on their websites. This sharing site only works if you participate. If you have something you would like to share, please do so. Please use appropriate bylines and credit lines to recognize where material came from.

Clemson vs. Georgia State

Coach Dabo Swinney  congratulating big play in second half.

Coach Dabo Swinney congratulating big play in second half.

By Joe Willis

Clemson Vs. Georgia

# 24 Marcus Caffey breaks a clemson tackle for a small gain.

# 24 Marcus Caffey breaks a clemson tackle for a small gain.

By Joe Willis

 

Clemson vs. Georgia State

Clemson quarter back, Cole Stoudt looking for open receiver during first half.

Clemson quarter back, Cole Stoudt looking for open receiver during first half.

By Joe Willis

Clemson Vs. Georgia State

Interception by # 20 Jyron Kearse.

Interception by # 20 Jyron Kearse.

By Joe Willis

 

Clemson vs. Georgia State

Germone Hopper reaching for the ball during 3rd quarter

Germone Hopper reaching for the ball during 3rd quarter

By Joe Willis

Clemson vs. Georgia State

by Joe Willis

Tyshon Dye Runs for long yardage.

By Joe Willis

 

 

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

Clemson vs. Georgia State

19

Adrien Dunn # 82  runs for 17 yards a after and reception

by Joe Willis

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina's Brandon Wilds. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Carolina’s Brandon Wilds. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

South Carolina's Damiere Byrd. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Carolina’s Damiere Byrd. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

South Carolina's defense makes the stop. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Carolina’s defense makes the stop. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

Dylan Thompson and Steve Spurrier talk things over. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Dylan Thompson and Steve Spurrier talk things over. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

South Carolina's Pharoh Cooper. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Carolina’s Pharoh Cooper. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

South Alabama's Braedon Bowman. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Alabama’s Braedon Bowman. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

South Carolina vs. South Alabama

South Alabama's Braedon Bowman. Pete Cochran/Union County News

South Alabama’s Shavarez Smith. Pete Cochran/Union County News

Please remember to include the writer’s name and the name of the newspaper.

Gov. Haley in India – Good, Travel More

Phil Noble

Phil Noble

by Phil Noble

Gov. Haley is on an eleven day trip to India. There are some who are grumbling, calling her trip just another post-election junket by a politician.

I disagree. I’m glad she taking the trip and, in fact, I think she should make more international trips — a lot more. Several months ago in this space, I even criticized her for having not already gone to India.

Now as a loyal Democrat and a member of the party that got killed in the last election, you might think I’m suffering from a severe case of post-traumatic stress disorder. Possibly, but I don’t think so and here’s why.

First, it’s the economy stupid. At a recent SC Chamber of Commerce meeting, one of the speakers talked about how 30% of all new business in SC is from foreign investment. Since January 2011, the state has recruited $6.7 billion in capital investment from foreign-owned companies. Think about that a minute. We are a state that desperately needs more and better jobs, and if 30% of our jobs were coming from the moon, I’d tell Haley to put on her space suit and crawl into a rocket and blast off. Our state’s leaders need to go where the jobs and growth potential are and that means going overseas.

Second, India is a huge emerging market and South Carolina needs to be there — and we need to have them here. By population, India is the second largest country in the world, four times the size of the US, and their economy is the 10th largest in the world. Spend a little time looking at how Gov. Haley is being treated in the India media, and it’s clear she is not just a star – she’s a rock star.

There is no potential Indian investor or business looking for an access point into the US market that wouldn’t jump to take her call and do back flips through a ring of fire to be seen with her and listen to her pitch about why they should come to South Carolina. Business relations begin with personal relations and this is a huge advantage for her – and us in South Carolina.

Third, Haley is a powerful symbol that can help disprove the popular negative stereotypes that many have about South Carolina. Let’s face it, too many folks internationally (if they know anything about our state at all) immediately assume all the negative stereotypes are true – plagued by racial tension, provincial attitudes, beholden to the past, not too bright, etc.

In short, people globally — and in the US for that matter — think we are a place of moonlight and magnolias and not micro-chips and molecular research. Haley is a young, attractive, sharp, first generation minority woman who is obviously popular in her home state. Not exactly what springs to mind when most people think of our state.

Fourth, Haley should travel more and go to non-traditional markets. Back in the early 1970s most Southern governors were flocking to the northeast, especially New York, trying to recruit the big industries to move to their state. Then Gov. John West went abroad, mostly to Europe. Despite my best research efforts I have been unable to get the definitive numbers, but I’m told that Gov. West may have taken as many as 30+ international trips during his four year term.

As a result of Gov. West’s counter-strategy, we got Michelin, Horst, Siemens and a whole host of other international plants to locate in South Carolina, mostly the Upstate. Today we have over 1,200 international facilities in our state accounting for 105,000 jobs.

Haley should adopt her own counter-strategy and go to “second tier” countries where others are not going. She should look at Indonesia, South Africa, Brazil, Kenya, Kurdistan, Estonia, Jordan and back to India several times. She should consider opening a state economic development office in India. All of these places are high growth economies looking to expand and find new and different entry points into the US market.

Fifth, pursing international investments and exporting SC products to global markets is about building on our current success. For the second year in a row, South Carolina ranked first in the nation for per-capita employment by foreign-owned firms. Business development experts will tell you it’s easiest to build on success and capitalize on existing relationships – i.e. we need to be leveraging our competitive advantage.

Now don’t get me wrong, Gov. Haley needs to take care of business in South Carolina and not neglect her other duties – and her trips need to be tightly focused on business and not just an excuse for her to vacation. (There do seem to be a lot of vacation type photo ops coming out of India; she needs to be very transparent about where she goes, who she meets, and what results.)

And she needs to make all of her trips lean, tight and thrifty. It’s not her money, it’s ours and she needs to ensure that we as a state get our money’s worth. Her 2011 trip to the Paris Air Show, where she took a huge entourage and spent lavishly on swanky hotels and lavish parties, shows just how quickly things can get out of hand. Such extravagance should never happen again.

But that said, she should travel more often and go to more new markets. She should take maximum advantage of her personal story to present the different and compelling image that she can uniquely present to the world about who we are as a state. And most importantly, she can show that South Carolina is able to effectively compete in the global market place of the 21st Century.

In the parlance of my 20-something year old daughter, “You go, girl.”

Phil Noble is a businessman in Charleston and President of the SC New Democrats, an independent reform group founded by former Gov. Richard Riley to bring big change and real reform. phil@scnedemocrats.org   www.SCNewDemocrats.org

The Start of Something (Really) Big

Phil Noble

Phil Noble

by Phil Noble

As a part of writing this column, I go to lots of meetings, community events and conferences all across the state in my never ending search to find out about the people, businesses and community groups that are doing good and important things to make our state better.

Last week I went to a conference on education in North Charleston. At the outset, it looked and sounded like lots of others that I’ve been to but after a while, it was clear that this one was different. The conference was sponsored by the Tri-County Cradle to Career Collaborative and was titled “Early Childhood Symposium – Mobilizing to Move the Dial on Early Childhood Indicators.”

I came away convinced that this conference was the start of something big — really big — for all of South Carolina. Here’s why.

Over many months and many miles of going to events such as this, I’ve learned to ask two fundamental questions: 1) Are they doing something new and different, or is this just more of the same? 2) Do the people behind this effort have the ability to implement what they are trying to do? The answer to these questions for this event was a resounding YES and YES.

First the idea. The Tri-county Cradle to Career is part of a growing national network of community education projects called StriveTogether – Cradle to Career Network. It is a national network of 53 community partnerships in 28 states working to improve education success for every child by bringing together cross-sector partners around a common vision. Together, the Network impacts over 5.5 million students nationwide.

Each of the local affiliates operates with essentially the same four-part strategy:

  1. Engage the community – Work with a broad array of community voices to create unified education strategies and solutions.
  2. Focus on eliminating locally defined disparities – Use local data to identify inequalities in student achievement and prioritize efforts to improve student outcomes.
  3. Develop a culture of continuous improvement- Use local data, community expertise and national research to identify areas for constant, disciplined improvement.
  4. Leverage existing assets- Build on and align existing community resources to maximize impact of the work.

If all this sounds vaguely familiar, especially for folks in the Upstate, it should. In 2008, people in Spartanburg County began to seriously look at developing a new initiative to deal with their education challenges as well. It began with a Chamber of Commerce Task Force, and among the recommendations was the 40/30 Challenge – to double the number of adult bachelor’s degree holders to 40% by 2030. This was indeed a bold and audacious goal and it led to the development of the College Hub, a new non-profit organization with a goal of achieving this single benchmark goal.

Another initiative growing out of the Chamber Task Force was the Children’s Service’s Alliance, which established a network of pre-K services providers and agencies to try and better coordinate services for children. These two efforts were then combined into the Spartanburg Academic Movement (SAM) that adopted the Strive model.

SAM’s goal is simple: “No excuses. Every child must be ready to learn to read when they enter school. They must be reading to learn by third grade. They must succeed in eighth grade math to manage the rigors of high school math and science. They must graduate high school prepared to achieve a post-secondary credential enabled to fulfill career ambitions involving vocational certification or college graduation.”

Initially, there were only a few school districts, notably in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky using this Strive model, but in their first six years, they showed remarkable results: 9% increase in kindergarten readiness, an 11% increase in high school graduation rates and a 10% increase in college enrollment.

Now that the model has been tested and improved, the results of many of the projects around the country are several times these levels. As a part of participating in the program, all Strive programs in each of the 75 communities have to report their performance every year and they can be found on the website, www.StiveTogether.org.

All of this brings us to my second question: Do the people behind this effort have the ability to implement what they are trying to do?

In both Spartanburg and the Tri-county area the answer is clearly YES. Everyone, and I mean everyone, in Spartanburg has signed up for The Movement. They call their agreement the “All In Partnership” and it means just what it says. In addition to their Board of the premier movers and shakers in the community, several hundred groups and organizations have signed on – literally, they have all signed a Partnership Pledge of what they will do to help make the Movement a Success. See www.LearnwithSam.org

Even at this early stage, it is clear that the Tri-County group is just as serious and just as committed to seeing their Cradle to Careers program work. The Lowcountry effort is being led by Anita Zucker, Chairwoman the InterTech Group. In addition to running a globally successful business, she has a long career of effective philanthropy and she has enlisted a group of leaders every bit as able and effective as their Spartanburg counterparts.

These two projects are stunning in their breadth and depth and also in the level of community commitment and involvement they have been able generate. Will they succeed? I’m betting they will – scratch that, I know they will.

We in this state have long been suffering from the “poor ole us” syndrome. We have lost sight of the fundamental truth of one of my favorite quotes from President John Kennedy: “Our problems are man-made, therefore they may be solved by man. And man can be as big as he wants. No problem of human destiny is beyond human beings.

It’s time for us in South Carolina to be big…and these extraordinary leaders at either end of the state are showing us the way.

Phil Noble is a businessman in Charleston and President of the SC New Democrats, an independent reform group founded by former Gov. Richard Riley to bring big change and real reform. phil@scnewdemocrats.org www.SCNewDemocrats.org

“Romney, Warren 2016″ by Stuart Neiman

"Romney, Warren 2016" by Stuart Neiman

“Romney, Warren 2016″ by Stuart Neiman

Photos: State Cheerleading Competition

All pictures are courtesy of the SCPA’s S.C. News Exchange and Member newspapers may download high-res files for publication directly from the photo gallery linked below.

http://www.gwinndavisphotos.com/Cheerleading/Cheerleading-State/45775370_vNxh3d#!i=3701625708&k=D9H22Z5

All of the winners are photographed, as well as many other schools.

State Champions:
Class AAAA Dutch Fork
Class AAA Chapin
Class A-AA Chesnee

If a newspaper has any special requests, please call Gwinn Davis at (864) 915-0411 or email GwinnDavis@gmail.com

“Second Fiddle” from The Times and Democrat

"Second Fiddle" from the Times and Democrat

“Second Fiddle” from The Times and Democrat

“Moved On” from The Times and Democrat

"Moved On" from the Times and Democrat

“Moved On” from the Times and Democrat